Podcasts

Survival of the Kindest Podcast List

66: David Aynsley – TR14-ers and What Community Policing Can Be

‘I realised that deprivation is lack of access to human rights. Because every measure of human rights, every human right is also a measure of deprivation. It’s almost the same language.’ The story of how a policeman became instrumental in setting up a Cornish dance group is fantastic. The TR14-ers, named by its young members, are based in Cambourne in Cornwall (a.k.a TR14) and was set up in 2005 by David Aynsley our guest this week. David’s core of compassion, and his understanding of how communities can be nurtured led him to sign his Neighbourhood Police Team up to the first ever Connecting Communities programme run by our former guest Hazel Stuteley, and the rest is history. It is an extraordinary story that shows what policing can do. The TR14-ers are now a self-run charity, the lessons are free, the young dancers self-organise and lead the dance sessions. This conversation is full of stories that show how you can feed what is good in a community that to many looks like there is nothing, how you can be a supportive police force, how amazing and hard that is, but mostly how worth it it is. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released. Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

65: Bennet Zelner – Regenerative Economics

‘My focus now is on how do we transform the economic system so that it fosters connection, that it helps people connect to other people, helps them connect to themselves and helps them connect to the natural world.’ This week Julian talks to regenerative economist Bennet Zelner. While economics is not something that is habitually associated with compassion, in this episode Bennet highlights how it affects us on a day to day level: How our current economic system is draining monetary resources from communities for the benefits of shareholders, and how large the impact of having a different system could be. Bennet’s work is revolutionary, and his mission of injecting humanity back into economics is well funded and long over due. By changing the way we think about money – as something that benefits many rather than just a few, we can change society. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released. Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

64: Nicole Hewlett – Knowing, Being and Doing

‘Our community is a living organism’ This week Julian talks to Nicole Hewlett. Nicole grew up unaware of her aboriginal roots until her teens, however she always had a deeper understanding of herself which somehow acknowledged a difference, and she always was drawn and emotionally and socially connected socially to minority communities. After studying Psychological sciences and then public health, Nicole now works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, as well non-indigenous communities, creating accessible palliative care that breaks down the current intrinsic barriers. The very deep knowledge that indigenous communities hold, from being over 60,000 years old, and from always drawing on their ancestors and their communal learning, is an entirely different understanding of life, death, people, animals and place, to the one we learn in schools and in life in general. Throughout the conversation Nicole gives shape to these ideas (in a language which inherently has tried to stamp out the aboriginal culture for many years), and what non-indigenous communities can learn, and how not having this understanding has been affecting the way society does social care, death and dying. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released. Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

63: Part 2 of Hazel Stuteley O.B.E – It’s Not Rocket Science

“The biological changes, the chemical changes that happen in the brain when people get a sense of inference and control is huge. It’s massive.” This week Julian and Hazel conclude their conversation about Hazel’s amazing work after the enormous success of the Beacon project in Cornwall. While Hazel had a disappointing stint with the Government, who failed to grasp the importance of what she achieved, her success did not go unnoticed. Through speaking up and down the country Hazel met a hoard of doctors, and various academics, who understood how transformative the Beacon project had been. Hazels work since then has been no less successful. And throughout all of it she has held onto the key principles that drove the initial project – connection, listening, and giving people space. While it sounds simple, it is incredibly hard to execute with authenticity. For more information on the work that Hazel has done you can hear last week’s episode, and also look at C2. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released. Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

62: Part 1 of Hazel Stuteley O.B.E – Beacon

‘I was taught how to be compassionate, and you need to be taught’ This week is the first part of a conversation with Hazel Stutley O.B.E. Her work has been lauded widely for both the impact that it has had and the way that stakeholders are at the centre of her work, in a way that has been truly transformative. In part 1 Hazel talks about how she came to community development, and in particular how she started the Beacon project in Cornwall which went on to win awards and, more importantly, had remarkable side effects on the community ranging from better school grades for primary school children, to safer housing. Hazel’s kindness, and belief in the ability of humans to also be kind and engaged given the opportunity, shines throughout this episode. Through connection and communication grounded in compassion, Hazel has achieved so much, and shown what is possible. For more information on the work that Hazel has done you can tune in to next week’s episode, and also look at C2 Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released. Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

61: Dr Rod Gritten – Part of Nature

‘We’re part of nature, we’re all nature and we’ve done a damn good job of trying to get away from that.’ This week Julian talks to ecologist Dr Rod Gritten, the former Head of Ecology of Snowdonia National Park. Since becoming enthralled with spiders as a young boy, Rod has always been invested and connectedContinue reading “61: Dr Rod Gritten – Part of Nature”

60: Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell – Flow with the River

“It’s when somebody’s dying that we can join with them in this beautiful space of the celebration; they’re transitioning.” This week Julian is joined by Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell, founding member of the Te Ārai Palliative and End of Life Research Group in the School of Nursing at the University of Auckland where she is also a Research Fellow. The reclamation of knowledge that is occurring world-over in indigenous communities has been making waves in every area of life and community, and in this podcast Dr Moeke Maxwell talks about how Maori knowledge and way of life has moved with her through her research in Palliative care and life in general. She brings deep historical and traditional knowledge that sees life, death, people and place in a way that western medicine could never understand and does not seek to. However, her research is seeking to bring that knowledge forward. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released. Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

59: Eivind Hoff-Elimari – Politics and Policy for the Good Life

“What if we don’t manage to stop a collapse of biodiversity? Then a windmill electric car will be of no value to, I guess, hurricanes against mass migration and so on. But if we’re doing what we know is a flourishing democracy, with equality and trust amongst people, that’ll mean everything” On this week’s episode Julian talks to Eivind Hoff-Elimari, local politician for the municipality of Nesodden in Norway. Eivind ‘s take on what politics is for is simple – it is for creating a good life. Not in the sense that we culturally understand a good life, but one that is good for everyone, people, places, plants, pets alike. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released.

58: Kristoffer Robin Haug – Big problems, easy to solve – Green Politics in Norway

“It’s hard in Norway, and this may be because we get so much of our national money from oil and gas. There’s an expression; never expect a man to understand something when his salary depends on him not understanding” Norwegian Green Party politician Kristoffer Robin takes Julian through where Green Politics is at this moment in time, and where he thinks it is pointing. Having grown from scientists who have seen and fully understood the situation we are in as a species, and as a planet, Green parties have often leaned towards alarmism. However in this conversation Kristoffer talks passionately about how green politics is also the politics of compassion, and one which is planning for a better future for humans, rather than for the stock market. Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released.