73. Professor George Slavich – What Does The Immune System Care About?

On the Survival of the Kindest podcast we try and piece together a variety of different views which help to explain why compassion is so important.
On this week’s podcast we hear about the fantastic work of Professor George Slavich. Starting with a psychology degree, George became increasingly interested in the biological impacts of social relationships. This led him to the field of psychoneuroimmunology. The depth of his interest is amazing. He has managed to describe as complete a picture of the impact of social relationships in all the body systems as we have. He has developed the field of social safety theory which comprehensively examines the evolutionary roots and the impacts of a variety of different environments, both physical and social, on how our bodies function.

72. Diana Reynolds – The Bigger Picture

“If you’re looking at the bits you’re not seeing the bigger picture” On this week’s Survival of the Kindest podcast I am delighted to welcome Diana Reynolds. Diana is the Sustainable Development Change Manager for Welsh Government, where she is a leadership coach and manages a long term behaviour change programme. Diana has, in variousContinue reading “72. Diana Reynolds – The Bigger Picture”

71. Judah Amani – Making Sense

“Music provides the vehicle to express things that are quite difficult to express” On this week’s Survival of the Kindest podcast I am delighted to welcome Judah Amani. Judah has an extraordinary background being brought up in Iran, London, and Israel. This unique combination of different cultural upbringings was somewhat disorientating for him. Judah foundContinue reading “71. Judah Amani – Making Sense”

69. Olaf Kuhlke – Cultural Entrepreneurship

This weeks survival of the kind of podcast features Olaf Kuhlke. Olaf was brought up in Germany and studied cultural geography. He went on to study higher degrees in Canada and the United States. He is an associate professor in the department of geography and philosophy at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Olaf’s career TookContinue reading “69. Olaf Kuhlke – Cultural Entrepreneurship”

68. Amara Leigh Hull – Happiness, Love and Health

“I guess we don’t really get taught so much at school about how to deal with hormones and how to accept them and be like, that’s okay, that’s fine.”

CW: depression and suicide.

This week Julian talks to TR-14er Amara Leigh Hull. Amara talks openly about the hardships she has been through ranging from depression in school, to how lockdown changed her life, and where dance and music has fitted in with that.

Throughout lockdowns, very dark periods, and going to uni, Amara has kept up working as a leader with the TR-14ers. To hear her speak about the place it has in her life is to learn from someone what a difference community can make.

66: David Aynsley – TR14-ers and What Community Policing Can Be

‘I realised that deprivation is lack of access to human rights. Because every measure of human rights, every human right is also a measure of deprivation. It’s almost the same language.’

The story of how a policeman became instrumental in setting up a Cornish dance group is fantastic. The TR14-ers, named by its young members, are based in Cambourne in Cornwall (a.k.a TR14) and was set up in 2005 by David Aynsley our guest this week. David’s core of compassion, and his understanding of how communities can be nurtured led him to sign his Neighbourhood Police Team up to the first ever Connecting Communities programme run by our former guest Hazel Stuteley, and the rest is history.

It is an extraordinary story that shows what policing can do. The TR14-ers are now a self-run charity, the lessons are free, the young dancers self-organise and lead the dance sessions. This conversation is full of stories that show how you can feed what is good in a community that to many looks like there is nothing, how you can be a supportive police force, how amazing and hard that is, but mostly how worth it it is.

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65: Bennet Zelner – Regenerative Economics

‘My focus now is on how do we transform the economic system so that it fosters connection, that it helps people connect to other people, helps them connect to themselves and helps them connect to the natural world.’

This week Julian talks to regenerative economist Bennet Zelner. While economics is not something that is habitually associated with compassion, in this episode Bennet highlights how it affects us on a day to day level: How our current economic system is draining monetary resources from communities for the benefits of shareholders, and how large the impact of having a different system could be.

Bennet’s work is revolutionary, and his mission of injecting humanity back into economics is well funded and long over due. By changing the way we think about money – as something that benefits many rather than just a few, we can change society.

Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released.

Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com

64: Nicole Hewlett – Knowing, Being and Doing

‘Our community is a living organism’

This week Julian talks to Nicole Hewlett. Nicole grew up unaware of her aboriginal roots until her teens, however she always had a deeper understanding of herself which somehow acknowledged a difference, and she always was drawn and emotionally and socially connected socially to minority communities. After studying Psychological sciences and then public health, Nicole now works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, as well non-indigenous communities, creating accessible palliative care that breaks down the current intrinsic barriers.

The very deep knowledge that indigenous communities hold, from being over 60,000 years old, and from always drawing on their ancestors and their communal learning, is an entirely different understanding of life, death, people, animals and place, to the one we learn in schools and in life in general. Throughout the conversation Nicole gives shape to these ideas (in a language which inherently has tried to stamp out the aboriginal culture for many years), and what non-indigenous communities can learn, and how not having this understanding has been affecting the way society does social care, death and dying.

Follow Survival of the Kindest on Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever you like to listen to get our episodes as they are released.

Email us compassion.pod@gmail.com